We came

Attendees
1,317
Connectors
156

1,317 Stanford alumni and guests connected in Los Angeles, and 156 Connectors helped make it happen.

We saw

Who were the stars of Stanford+Connects? Professors, President Hennessy...and you!

We connected

Who did you connect with? Find and tag your friends!

Stay connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

Stanford Connectors smile for the camera.

Schedule — Saturday, February 1, 2014

12:30 p.m.

Check-In and Meet Up

1:00 p.m.

Find a Seat

1:15 p.m.

Welcome

Howard E. Wolf, '80, Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association

Read more

Howard has led the Stanford Alumni Association and its staff since 2001. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology, with distinction, from Stanford in 1980 and his MBA from Harvard in 1985. Before his appointment as Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association, he worked as both an entrepreneur and business manager in the publishing and commercial real estate development and management industries. An active alum and volunteer, as well as an avid Stanford athletics fan, he received the Stanford Associates Outstanding Achievement Award in 2000. In addition to his Alumni Association role, Howard is one of eight officers of the University and part of its senior management team, with particular responsibility for advising the University's president and the provost on alumni affairs.

Presidential Remarks and Q&A

John L. Hennessy, President, Stanford University

Read more

President of Stanford University since 2000, John L. Hennessy is the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. He joined the faculty in 1977 and since then has served as chair of computer science, dean of the School of Engineering and provost. A pioneer in computer architecture, his technology revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. He has lectured and published widely and co-authored two textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy has received numerous honors, including the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award.

2:10 p.m.

Event Host

Dan Klein, '90, is a lecturer in theater and performance studies in the Graduate School of Business and on the teaching team at the Hasso Plattner Institute for Design (d.school).

Read more

Klein’s teaching taps into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. A longtime improv instructor of beginning and advanced improvisation, he has helped create student groups including the Robber Barons (original sketch comedy), the Flying Treehouse (children’s theater) and Stanford Improvisors, an improv troupe that has performed on campus and in the community for 25 years.

2:15 p.m.

Micro Lectures

Chris Gerdes photo

Who Will Be Driving on the Highway of the Future?

Chris Gerdes is an associate professor of mechanical engineering and the director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford.

The Evolution of Beauty

Jill Helms is a professor in plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford University’s School of Medicine.

Designing Music

Kai Kight, ’14, is a violinist, composer and 2013 Mayfield Fellow in the Stanford Technology Ventures Program.

Nerd Nation: Continuing the Tradition of Athletic and Academic Excellence

Bernard Muir is the Jaquish and Kenninger Director of Athletics at Stanford University.

Read more

Coach Muir brings nearly 25 years of athletic administrative experience at Delaware, Georgetown, Notre Dame, Butler, Auburn and the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA). He has directed Delaware's athletic program since 2009 and, before that, was director of athletics at Georgetown from 2005 to 2009. As an undergraduate at Brown University, Muir was a four-year letter winner in basketball.

Meet the man behind Stanford athletics. Bernard Muir brings nearly 25 years of athletic administrative experience from various universities and the NCAA. He speaks with us about what’s happening on the field and in the classroom.

Bernard Muir brings nearly 25 years of athletic administrative experience from Delaware, Georgetown, Notre Dame, Butler, Auburn and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). He directed Delaware's athletics program from 2009 to 2012 and was director of athletics at Georgetown from 2005 to 2009. He earned a bachelor’s degree in organizational behavior and management from Brown University, where he was a four-year basketball letterman and team co-captain his senior year, as well as a master’s in sports administration from Ohio University.

A Crash Course in Creativity with 40,000 Students

Tina Seelig, PhD ’85, is a professor of the practice in management science and engineering and the executive director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program.

Stanford Solar Decathlon: Students Creating Sustainable Homes

Lilly Shi, ’14 is the communications lead of the Solar Decathlon team.

3:30 p.m.

Break

4:15 p.m.

Breakout Seminars

Attend one of the afternoon seminars for an in-depth look at the topic that most interests you.

Bioengineering Approaches for Visualizing and Treating Cancer

Jennifer Cochran is the Hitachi America Associate Professor of Bioengineering and (by courtesy) chemical engineering, and a faculty member in the biophysics and cancer biology graduate programs.

Read more

Professor Cochran's laboratory uses interdisciplinary techniques in chemistry, biology and engineering to create tools for wound healing, cardiac tissue repair, and cancer imaging and therapy. Learn how her lab’s designer proteins may lead to treatments for human patients.

Jennifer Cochran's laboratory uses interdisciplinary techniques in chemistry, biology and engineering to create tailor-made proteins for wound healing, cardiac tissue repair, and cancer imaging and therapy. Several designer proteins are under various stages of development for translation into human patients. Professor Cochran has received the National Cancer Institute Howard Temin Award, the Martin D. Abeloff Scholar Award from the V Foundation for Cancer Research, and a Sidney Kimmel Scholar Award, a research grant given to the nation’s most promising young cancer researchers.

Forging a New Immigration System for the United States

Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar, MA '96, PhD '00, is the director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, the Morrison Professor of Law and a professor of political science (by courtesy).

Read more

How is immigration affecting the United States and other nation-states? What is the role of migration in a world connected by trade, information and capital flows? Professor Cuéllar helps us understand the forces affecting the United States and other states in an insecure world.

Tino Cuéllar works at the intersection of law, public policy and political science. His research and teaching focus on administrative law; executive power; and the ways organizations implement public health and safety, migration, and international security in a changing world. Professor Cuéllar has served on the Council of the Administrative Conference of the United States to improve the efficiency and fairness of federal regulatory programs. He was also a special assistant to President Obama for justice and regulatory policy, leading work on borders and immigration, public health and food safety, criminal justice and drug policy, regulatory reform, civil rights, and rural and agricultural policy. Professor Cuéllar presented at Stanford+Connects Europe.

 

Controlling and Mapping the Brain with Light

Karl Deisseroth, PhD '98, MD '00, is the D.H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and Psychiatry at Stanford University. He is director of undergraduate education in bioengineering and a practicing psychiatrist.

Read more

While optogenetics sends light into the brain to gain unprecedented access to fully intact biological systems (such as mice), the CLARITY method renders the brain transparent so researchers can closely examine its structure. Professor Deisseroth discusses these methods and how they might lead to new treatments for psychiatric diseases.

Karl Deisseroth has developed and applied novel technologies for controlling (optogenetics) and imaging (CLARITY) brain activity, and continues to develop and apply new technologies to study physiology and behavior in health and disease. He has received the NIH Pioneer Award, the Society for Neuroscience Young Investigator Award, the UNC/Perl Prize and the BRAIN prize. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences.

Global Warming: Fact versus Fiction

Robert Dunbar is the W.M. Keck Professor of Earth Science, a professor of environmental earth system science, the J. Frederick and Elisabeth B. Weintz University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment.

Read more

Professor Dunbar heads a research group working on past and present changes in the ocean and their impacts on marine communities. His research interests include climate change, marine ecology and biogeochemistry. An expert on glaciers, sea ice and other polar systems, Professor Dunbar has traveled to the Antarctic and the Arctic many times for research projects and the Alumni Association’s Travel/Study program and is a reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 2009, he received the Richard W. Lyman Award for exceptional volunteer service to alumni.

How much of our changing climate results from human impacts on our planet? How much is simply an expression of the long-term changes in temperatures and rainfall? Professor Dunbar considers the facts of climate change, the uncertainty in our forecasts and the politicization of climate-change messaging.

Professor Dunbar heads a research group working on past and present changes in the ocean and their impacts on marine communities. His research interests include climate change, marine ecology and biogeochemistry. An expert on glaciers, sea ice and other polar systems, Professor Dunbar has traveled to the Antarctic and the Arctic many times for research projects and the Alumni Association’s Travel/Study program and is a reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 2009, he received the Richard W. Lyman Award for exceptional volunteer service to alumni.

Chris Gerdes photo

The Racetrack as Laboratory and Classroom: Developing Safer Cars and Students through Racing

Chris Gerdes is an associate professor of mechanical engineering and the director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford (CARS).

Read more

While computers have the advantage of superior processing power and reaction time, self-driving cars cannot yet match the performance of the best human drivers on the racetrack. Learn how Professor Gerdes is attempting to bring the vehicle to its full potential by studying racecar drivers.

Chris Gerdes’ research interests include vehicle dynamics, the design of driver assistance systems, control of autonomous vehicles and the measurement of brain activity while driving. His lab developed autonomous racing and drifting algorithms to enable Shelley, an Audi TT-S, to race up Pikes Peak without a driver. Professor Gerdes is a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in recognition for his work with driver assistance systems.

Recapturing Youth: Aging, Stem Cells and the Hope of Regenerative Medicine

Jill Helms is a professor in plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. Her main research interests are in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

Read more

As we grow older, skin loses its elasticity, bones become more brittle and injuries heal more slowly. Professor Helms discusses the use of stem cells to repair and regenerate aged tissues, and showcases recent discoveries that have the potential to make us fit and healthy well into old age.

Jill Helms has a strong interest in mentoring students, and has used television programs (Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, BBC), YouTube lectures, podcasts, profcasts and high school outreach programs to reach students of all ages. Professor Helms serves on a number of scientific advisory boards and journal editorial boards, and reviews grants and manuscripts for a range of high-profile journals. She spoke at Stanford+Connects Arizona.

The Improviser’s Mindset: Effortless Creativity, Agility and Resourcefulness

Dan Klein ’90, is a lecturer in theater and performance studies in the Graduate School of Business. He is also a member of the teaching team at the Hasso Plattner Institute for Design (d.school).

Read more

How often do you think and act outside of your own box? Lecturer Dan Klein, whose students named him Teacher of the Year in 2009, taps into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. In this hands-on workshop, learn how to channel ideas and express them in a compelling way on demand, onstage and beyond.

Dan Klein teaches workshops on improv and design for interdisciplinary graduate students at the d.school. His workshops tap into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. He directs the Stanford Improvisors, a 19-year-old improv troupe that performs on campus and in the community. In 2009, students named him Stanford Teacher of the Year. Klein presented at Stanford+Connects Arizona.

Islamic Revolution in Iran and the Arab Spring: Confluence or Conflict?

Abbas Milani is the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies, a co-director of the Iran Democracy Project and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

Read more

Was the Arab Spring a continuation of the 1979 revolution and further indication of a “historic turn” in favor of radical Islam? Or have we already begun the “post-radical Islam” era? Join Professor Milani for a conversation on the prospects for democracy.

Abbas Milani is an expert in the cultural, political and social issues facing Iran, as well as U.S.-Iranian relations. He is widely published on various facets of modern Iranian history and politics and the troubled history of that country’s relations with the United States. Dr. Milani’s most recent book, The Shah, was chosen by The Wall Street Journal as one of the books of the year. It focuses on the roots of the Islamic revolution, seen through the prism of the Shah’s life. 

Who Gets What? The New Economics of Matching and Market Design

Alvin E. Roth, MS ’73, PhD ’74, is the Craig and Susan McCaw Professor of Economics and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

Read more

Professor Roth addresses recent developments in market design, for which he shared the 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics. He suggests ways to think about why some transactions may be regarded as repugnant, and how we might think about what are free markets.

Alvin Roth is a pioneer in game theory and experimental economics and in their application to the design of new economic institutions. His work on the theory of matching markets includes redesigning mechanisms for selecting medical residents; multistep kidney exchanges; and school choice in New York City, Boston, Denver and New Orleans. Professor Roth shared the 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for his work on market design. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and a member of the National Academy of Science. He has also been a Guggenheim and Sloan fellow.

Workshop: A Crash Course on Creativity

Tina Seelig, PhD ’85, is a professor of the practice in management science and engineering and the executive director for the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), the entrepreneurship center at the School of Engineering.

Read more

Professor Seelig reveals a set of tools and conditions that we each control—our innovation engine—that help us spark creative genius and generate fresh ideas. She shows that just as the scientific method demystifies the process of discovery, there is a formal process for unlocking the pathway to invention.

Tina Seelig teaches creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in the department of Management Science and Engineering and within the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, the d.school. Professor Seelig has written 16 popular books, including What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 and inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity. She is the recipient of several national awards, including the Gordon Prize from the National Academy of Engineering, recognizing her as national leader in engineering education. Professor Seelig hosted the Stanford+Connects event in Minnesota.

An Insider’s View of Stanford Football

David Shaw, ’94, is the Bradford M. Freeman Director of Football and Head Coach.

Read more

Head coach David Shaw takes you behind the scenes of Stanford football. Learn how the Cardinal approaches recruiting, the leadership philosophy on the field, and how high expectations builds strong student athletes.

David Shaw led Stanford football to the BCS 2013 Rose Bowl Game in his second season. He served as Stanford’s offensive coordinator for four seasons from 2007 to 2010 and became the 34th head coach in Stanford history in 2011. Prior to Stanford, his coaching resume includes nine years of NFL experience with the Philadelphia Eagles, Oakland Raiders and Baltimore Ravens. He was the 2012 Pac-12 Conference Coach of the Year, and with him at the helm in 2012, Stanford earned the American Football Coaches Association’s Academic Achievement Award.

Drawing from Life: Why the Arts Matter at Stanford

Connie Wolf, ’81, is the John and Jill Freidenrich Director of the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University.

Read more

It’s a transformational moment for the arts at Stanford. Join Cantor Center director Connie Wolf for a sneak peek of new programs and facilities, discover more about the arts district, and join the conversation about why the arts matter now more than ever.

Connie Wolf is leading the museum at a transformative time for the arts on campus, as the university develops its new arts district with the Cantor Arts Center at its core. She is focused on making the museum and the arts a more integral part of the student learning experience, developing innovative interdisciplinary initiatives and building the collection to be a more vital resource for research and teaching. Previously, she worked at the Whitney Museum and led the Contemporary Jewish Museum, which grew rapidly from a small, community-based organization to a major institution in San Francisco’s Yerba Buena arts district.

5:15 p.m.

Break

5:45 p.m.

Breakout Seminars repeated

Attend one of the afternoon seminars for an in-depth look at the topic that most interests you.

6:45 p.m.

Reception

Look Who Connected

First Name Maiden Name Last Name Degree(s) Parent Year(s) City State
Ritchie Geisel MBA '73 Burbank CA
Michael Jones Los Angeles CA
Maricela Lopez P '99 Stockton CA
Rande Sotomayor Altadena CA
Brian Copple '82 Newport Beach CA

Special thanks to all the Stanford+Connects Los Angeles Connectors without whose help this event would not have been possible. See all local connectors.

Student Ambassadors

No Stanford event would be complete without students. That’s why 20 star scholars—who also happen to be athletes, activists, entrepreneurs, artists and so on—were invited to join you as your student ambassadors for the day. They’re looking forward to connecting with you, so don’t be shy!

Dhruv Amin

Dhruv Amin, '14, is a computer science major from Piedmont, California. His favorite class at Stanford so far has been machine learning; but improv, advanced wine tasting, springboard diving, golf and the history of rock & roll were all very close seconds. Dhruv is currently serving as Senior Class President and teaching intro-level computer science as a section leader. After graduating he plans on staying close enough to Stanford to attend football games while working in Google’s San Francisco office as a product manager.

Christian Angulo

Christian Angulo, ’14, is majoring in political science and communication. An avid sports fan, Christian loves playing basketball and soccer with friends, as well as attending as many Cardinal athletics events as possible. A California kid, Christian plans to stay in Palo Alto post-graduation to work at a startup as he decides whether or not to attend law school.

Sharon Barazani

Sharon Barazani, ’15, is a biology major with a passion for people. Last summer she traveled to Tanzania where she taught and conducted research on HIV/AIDS. On campus she combines her philanthropic instincts with a passion for food by baking challah with Stanford’s Challah for Hunger. Sharon tries to spend as much time outdoors as possible; she just returned from a quarter studying in Australia. If anybody is looking for a backpacking buddy, she’s game.

 

Cassandra Brooks

Cassandra Brooks, a second-year PhD student with the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, is studying international ocean policy with a focus on marine protection in the Antarctic. She has worked in the lab, underwater and at sea and has presented her work at international conferences and workshops. During her most recent research trip to the Antarctic in early 2013 with EESS Professor Rob Dunbar, Cassandra blogged for the National Geographic. Upon graduating, she hopes to continue working on marine conservation in the Antarctic and other ocean areas in urgent need of sustainable management.

 

Stephen Erlien

Stephen Erlien, MS ’12, PhD ’14, worked on the Chevy Volt at General Motors before coming to Stanford to study mechanical engineering. His research focuses on the benefits of human drivers and computers sharing control to make cars safer. When he's not programming cars he can often be found playing softball or flag football on campus, or learning Chinese. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in ‘08, minutes away from where he grew up in Janesville, Wisconsin.

Melissa Gordon

Melissa Gordon, ’15, is a transfer student majoring in English with an emphasis on gender studies and a minor in education. Prior to Stanford she attended Los Angeles Valley College, where she worked for three years as a tutor and interned educator, eventually branching out to tutor in underprivileged middle schools and high schools across Los Angeles. At Stanford, she plans to research literacy initiatives and college integration in K-12. Outside the classroom she works as an admission associate at the Stanford Office of Undergraduate Admission and as a contributing writer at The Stanford Daily.

 

Steven Greitzer

Los Angeles native Steven Greitzer, '13, MS '14, is a 5th-year coterm pursuing a Masters in Management Science & Engineering. While majoring in Science, Technology and Society and exploring product design and screenwriting on the side, Steven was honored to be selected as a Mayfield Fellow. As an undergrad, Steven enjoyed serving as a Class President and as a member of Sigma Nu. As a graduate student he hopes to do more skiing in Tahoe and trips to San Francisco. He hopes to remain in Silicon Valley after grad school to pursue a startup of his own.

 

Kai Kight

Kai Kight, '14, is a senior majoring in Product Design Engineering. A native of Washington, DC, Kai loves the innovative spirit of Stanford and the Silicon Valley. He was a 2013 Mayfield Fellow in Stanford's Technology Venture Program. His favorite class over his time at Stanford as been a Health Behavior Design course taught by Dr. BJ Fogg. Perhaps his most memorable Stanford Experience has been performing in Stanford's new Bing Concert Hall. Kai was recently admitted into Stanford's Graduate School Business MBA program with a 2 year deferral. During this interim period, he plans to pursue a career in music.

 

Simar Mangat

Simar Mangat ’17, plans to double-major in computer science and mechanical science & engineering. His favorite Stanford experience to date has been the Band Run, where he was swept into a “frenzy of awesomeness” dancing and playing with the Band. With just one full quarter under his belt, Simar has already gotten highly involved in Bhangra Punjabi dance and Frosh Council. As Frosh Council President, he’s had the opportunity to work closely with other class leaders and plan events for the Class of ’17. Simar has a kindness blog, and on Fridays he cruises around campus giving out free hugs.

 

Anna Nti-Asare

Anna Nti-Asare ’14, is a senior majoring in anthropology with a focus on medical anthropology. She’s writing her honors thesis on the influence of sex education on the identity and well-being of young adults. In her time at Stanford, Anna has served as president of the Black Student Union, executive director of Alternative Spring Break, a performing artist, and is currently an RA in Ujamaa. Last year Anna started a philanthropy initiative to raise money for women's health clinics through fashion photography. She recently finished applying to PhD programs and hopes someday to be a professor of anthropology and gender studies, ideally at Stanford.

 

Erik Olesund

Erik Olesund, ‘14, is a Master's student in management science and engineering, a teaching assistant at the d.school and a teaching fellow with the FEED Collaborative. Erik works at the intersection of economic policy, social justice, ecological resilience and human-centered design and is especially interested in unlocking human and organizational creativity to drive the transformation of our economic system. When he's not promoting the greater good through the design of sustainable systems, he’s on stage performing improv theater with the Stanford Improvisors (SImps) or having a cup of coffee with good company—the most Swedish way to socialize.

 

Laurel Pecchia

Laurel Pecchia, ’16, is a communication and French double major with a deep background in acting and film. As the director of a rebranding initiative for a tech start-up this summer, she discovered a love of (and penchant for) marketing. Laurel spends much of her time working with the Stanford Film Society and Stanford Students in Entertainment; she’s also an associate member of the prestigious Stanford Marketing Group.

 

Lauren "Motown" Phillips

Lauren “Motown” Phillips, ’17, is an art history major who hails from the one and only Detroit, Michigan. She is on the Internal Development team for the Stanford Student Alumni Council and a member of Pi Beta Phi. Her proudest achievement so far at Stanford has been co-chairing the 16th Annual Black Student Union Youth Empowerment Conference. On campus, she can likely be found roaming around the Anderson Collection or the McMurtry Building during the day, or chowing on chicken fingers and waffle fries from the Axe & Palm at night.

Holly Russell

Holly Russell, M.S. ’09, PhD ’14 studies mechanical engineering with an emphasis on control systems. Her research focuses on the intersection of automotive control and human learning. She has been a mentor for the robotics team at Castilleja School in Palo Alto for several years. She loves playing piano, swimming in the new Avery Recreation Pool, and cheering on the Stanford football team. She was raised in Laramie, Wyoming, and attended the University of California, Santa Barbara.

 

Lilly Shi

Lilly Shi, '14, is an architectural design major who is also interested in medicine, mechanical engineering and product design. After her experience as communications lead for the 2013 Stanford Solar Decathlon team, she’s considering an MBA and/or coterm in mechanical engineering. In her free time she can be found drumming with Stanford Taiko (which she fell in love with during a summer seminar), tutoring, at the climbing wall, or covered in the remnants of her latest project.

Emma Steinkellner

Emma Steinkellner, ’16, is an active member of the arts community at Stanford, a proud member of the Stanford Improvisors (SImps) and Flying Treehouse Children’s Theater Company, and an illustrator for The Stanford Daily. She is also keenly interested in feminist, gender, and sexuality studies and hopes to one day use what she’s learned at Stanford working in children’s educational media.

 

Anna Wang

Anna Wang, '17, is a freshman currently leaning toward a major in computer science. She enjoys studying an array of topics, and her favorite course so far has been "Creative Expression in Writing." A member of the club badminton team, frosh council, Stanford Society of Women Engineers, and the Compass Social Entrepreneurship Fellowship, Anna loves the dynamic spirit of Stanford. She also loves the beauty of campus and can often be found taking midnight strolls. After graduating Anna hopes to create a product or service to make life easier for residents of third-world countries. She was raised in Arcadia, California.

 

Anthony Wilkerson

Anthony Wilkerson ’14, from Tustin, California, is majoring in communication with an emphasis in marketing. A member of the Stanford Varsity Football team, Anthony is happy discussing football, basketball, nutrition and brain injuries in sports. His favorite Stanford tradition is Big Game. He also loves making music, writing poetry and social media. He has a cat named Moxy.

Oscar Wong

Los Angeles native Oscar Wong, ’15, is a first-generation college student studying economics and management science & engineering. On campus, he is a brother of Alpha Kappa Psi, chief financial officer of the business association of Stanford Entrepreneurial Students and a representative on the Stanford Athletics Student Advisory Board. His passions include social entrepreneurship, tennis, and traveling—including a recent spring break trip to Patagonia, Chile. Oscar has explored various industries with internships at Adobe, Bank of America Merrill Lynch and PacSun. This summer he looks forward to joining Apple Finance in Cupertino.

 

Sarahi Zaldumbide

Sarahi Zaldumbide, ’14, an international relations major from Kennesaw, Georgia, is busy writing her honors thesis on American foreign policy toward Latin American countries during the Cold War. Outside of classes and thesis writing, Sarahi works with the Office of Diversity and First Generation Students to provide resources and programming for diversity and identity issues. Sarahi’s favorite Stanford experiences to date have including storming the field during the Stanford-USC game and spending six months with Stanford in Paris. She speaks Spanish, French, and Football, and would love to talk with you in any one of those languages at Stanford+Connects in Los Angeles.

 

Stay Connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

Learn

Dive deeper with these additional resources recommended by the professors and students who spoke at Stanford+Connects Los Angeles. 

  • Channel your inner musician—and unlock your creativity—with world-renowned Warner Music recording artists, Stanford music scholars and industry executives. "Creativity: Music to My Ears" is a free online course taught by Professor Seelig, PhD ’85, launching on April 2. Use the code 'NerdNation2014' to team up with Stanford community members.
  • Dig deeper into the ethics of autonomous cars (and more) by reading Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society (CIS) blog written by Patrick Lin, an affiliate scholar at CIS.
  • Check out Stanford’s Solar Decathlon website to learn how Lily Shi, ’14 and the rest of the Start.Home team have revolutionized sustainable living by designing homes that can morph to serve its residents' changing needs.
  • Watch a time-lapse video of how a human face forms, discover why we hiccup and find out what other oddities our amphibious ancestors left behind for us.
  • Get the scoop on the "molecular flashlight" that Jennifer Cochran and other scientists recently developed to illuminate brain tumors in mice.
  • Pretend you’re a student in Alvin Roth's, MS '73, PhD '74, Market Design class by reading the Nobel Prize winner's personal blog, which address the complexities of commercial surrogacy, the algorithm of athletic recruiting and more.
  • Read Stanford Magazine’s profile of Tino Cuellar, MA '96, PhD '00, whose position as special assistant to President Obama for justice and regulatory policy had him tackling issues as complex as borders and immigration, public health and food safety, criminal justice and drug policy, regulatory reform, civil rights, and rural and agricultural policy.

About Stanford+Connects

Stanford+Connects was a 16-city event tour that helped alumni re-experience Stanford (minus the midterms), multiply their networks and stretch their brain in infinite ways.