We came

Attendees
515
Connectors
118

515 Stanford alumni and guests connected in San Diego, and 118 Connectors helped make it happen.

We saw

Who were the stars of Stanford+Connects? Professors, President Hennessy... and you!

We connected

Who did you connect with? Find and tag your friends!

Stay connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

San Diego Connectors smile for the camera.

Schedule — Saturday, November 8, 2014

12:45 p.m.

Check In & Meet Up

Pick up your name tag, grab some coffee and a light bite, and start connecting with your fellow alums.

1:15 p.m.

Find A Seat

1:30 p.m.

Welcome

Howard E. Wolf, ’80, Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association

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Howard has led the Stanford Alumni Association and its staff since 2001. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology, with distinction, from Stanford in 1980 and his MBA from Harvard in 1985. Before his appointment as Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association, he worked as both an entrepreneur and business manager in the publishing and commercial real estate development and management industries. An active alum and volunteer, as well as an avid Stanford athletics fan, he received the Stanford Associates Outstanding Achievement Award in 2000. In addition to his Alumni Association role, Howard is one of eight officers of the University and part of its senior management team, with particular responsibility for advising the University's president and the provost on alumni affairs.

Presidential Remarks and Q&A

John L. Hennessy, President, Stanford University

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President of Stanford University since 2000, John L. Hennessy is the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. He joined the faculty in 1977 and since then has served as chair of computer science, dean of the School of Engineering and provost. A pioneer in computer architecture, his technology revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. He has lectured and published widely and co-authored two textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy has received numerous honors, including the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award.

2:25 p.m.

Event Host

Leticia Britos Cavagnaro, PhD ’11 is deputy director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter) and lecturer at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school).

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Britos Cavagnaro teaches students of all disciplines how to build their creative confidence to become engines of innovation in teams and organizations. She obtained her PhD in developmental biology from the School of Medicine and is a former member of the Research in Education & Design Lab (REDlab) at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education. She has taught design thinking, creativity and innovation to hundreds of teachers and students of all ages, as well as corporate and nonprofit leaders around the world. Last summer, she engaged thousands of people from more than 130 countries in an experiential Design Thinking Action Lab online course via Stanford Online

Micro Lectures

These bite-size lectures will get your brain buzzing.

Discovering Ancient Forests of the Deep: Submersible Adventures in the Pacific

Rob Dunbar is the W.M. Keck Professor of Earth Science, a professor of environmental earth system science, J. Frederick and Elisabeth B. Weintz University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Woods Institute for the Environment.

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Professor Dunbar heads a research group working on past and present changes in the ocean and their impacts on marine communities. His research interests include climate change, marine ecology and biogeochemistry. An expert on glaciers, sea ice and other polar systems, Professor Dunbar has traveled to the Antarctic and the Arctic many times for research projects and the Alumni Association’s Travel/Study program and is a reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 2009, he received the Richard W. Lyman Award for exceptional volunteer service to alumni.

Materials That Heal

Sarah Heilshorn is an associate professor of materials science and engineering and, by courtesy, of chemical engineering and of bioengineering.

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Professor Heilshorn designs new materials that mimic those found in our own bodies for use in applications ranging from tissue engineering to regenerative medicine. Professor Heilshorn’s research interests involve the engineering of biological systems from the molecular to multi-cellular level. Current projects include protein-engineered materials for regenerative medicine and the design of injectable materials for stem cell and drug delivery. She has received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the National Institutes of Health New Innovator Award.

Musical Performance: “Bring Him Home” from "Les Miserables"

Matthew Billman, ’15, is a pop-classical crossover singer/composer and undergraduate in the human biology program.

Incorporate Play into Your Work

Brendan Boyle, MS '88, is a consulting associate professor at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school).

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In addition to his work at the d.school, Boyle is also a Partner at IDEO. At Stanford, he created a course “From Play to Innovation” that he teaches at the d.school, where he was named a Knight Fellow Favorite Professor. At IDEO, a leading design and innovation firm and one of the most innovative companies in the world, Professor Boyle founded and leads its toy-invention studio, known as the Toy Lab. Under his leadership, they have invented and licensed over 150 consumer products, specializing in the design of kid-centric goods, services and experiences. He is a co-author of The Klutz Books of Inventions and sits on the board of the National Institute for Play where he focuses on bringing play-based techniques to innovation.

On Making Better Decisions

Chip Heath, PhD ’91, is the Thrive Foundation for Youth Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

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Professor Heath’s research examines why certain ideas survive and prosper in the social marketplace of ideas. At Stanford, he teaches courses on business strategy and organizations, including a popular elective at Stanford where students explore new ways of using the principles of naturally sticky ideas to design more effective messages. He is the co-author (along with his brother, Dan) of three books: Decisive: How to Make Better Decisions in Life and Work, Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard, and Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die.

3:40 p.m.

Break

4:10 p.m.

Seminars & Workshops

Choose one of five classic seminars or interactive workshops for an intellectual deep dive.

BIOENGINEERING - Special Delivery: Engineering Strategies to Deliver Adult Stem Cell Therapies

Sarah Heilshorn is an associate professor of materials science and engineering and, by courtesy, of chemical engineering and of bioengineering.

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Patient-derived stem cells can treat a vast range of diseases and injuries. But to be effective they must be delivered to the correct location in the body. Professor Heilshorn is using chemically engineered technologies to deliver stem cells safely and efficiently.

Professor Heilshorn designs new materials that mimic those found in our own bodies for use in applications ranging from tissue engineering to regenerative medicine. Professor Heilshorn’s research interests involve the engineering of biological systems from the molecular to multi-cellular level. Current projects include protein-engineered materials for regenerative medicine and the design of injectable materials for stem cell and drug delivery. She has received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the National Institutes of Health New Innovator Award.

CLIMATE CHANGE - Global Warming: Fact versus Fiction

Rob Dunbar is the W.M. Keck Professor of Earth Science, a professor of environmental earth system science, J. Frederick and Elisabeth B. Weintz University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Woods Institute for the Environment.

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How much of our changing climate results from human impacts on our planet? How much is simply an expression of the long-term changes in temperatures and rainfall? Professor Dunbar considers the facts of climate change, the uncertainty in our forecasts and the politicization of climate-change messaging.

Professor Dunbar heads a research group working on past and present changes in the ocean and their impacts on marine communities. His research interests include climate change, marine ecology and biogeochemistry. An expert on glaciers, sea ice and other polar systems, Professor Dunbar has traveled to the Antarctic and the Arctic many times for research projects and the Alumni Association’s Travel/Study program and is a reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 2009, he received the Richard W. Lyman Award for exceptional volunteer service to alumni.

D.SCHOOL WORKSHOP - Design Thinking: Predicting the Future by Inventing It

Leticia Britos Cavagnaro, PhD ’11 is deputy director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter) and lecturer at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school).

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Want to be a better problem solver? A creative process is all it takes. In this hands-on workshop, Lecturer Britos-Cavagnaro will give you a taste of design thinking skills to apply to every discipline, at every stage of life. 

Britos Cavagnaro teaches students of all disciplines how to build their creative confidence to become engines of innovation in teams and organizations. She obtained her PhD in developmental biology from the School of Medicine and is a former member of the Research in Education & Design Lab (REDlab) at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education. She has taught design thinking, creativity and innovation to hundreds of teachers and students of all ages, as well as corporate and nonprofit leaders around the world. Last summer, she engaged thousands of people from more than 130 countries in an experiential Design Thinking Action Lab online course via Stanford Online

DECISION MAKING - How to Make Better Decisions

Chip Heath, PhD ’91, is the Thrive Foundation for Youth Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

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People make flawed decisions. Recent research in psychology and behavioral economics has confirmed that simple truth. Professor Heath will explore simple ways, many taking less than five minutes, to substantially improve the quality of our decisions.

Professor Heath’s research examines why certain ideas survive and prosper in the social marketplace of ideas. At Stanford, he teaches courses on business strategy and organizations, including a popular elective at Stanford where students explore new ways of using the principles of naturally sticky ideas to design more effective messages. He is the co-author (along with his brother, Dan) of three books: Decisive: How to Make Better Decisions in Life and Work, Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard, and Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die.

GREEK PHILOSOPHY - How to Lead the Good Life

Marsh McCall, P ’86, ’89, ’93, is an professor of classics and former dean of Continuing Studies.

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If one talk could change the way you approach your life, this might be it. You’ll learn about the core ethical beliefs of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans and the Stoics, and consider how those schools confront fundamental human issues.

Since his arrival at Stanford in 1976, Professor McCall has served three times as chairman of the classics department, as associate dean of undergraduate studies and as chairman of the Western Culture program committee. In 1991, he was awarded the Dinkelspiel Award for outstanding service to undergraduate education, and in 2000 he received Stanford's Phi Beta Kappa Teacher of the Year award. He is a popular faculty leader for the Alumni Association’s Travel/Study program, leading more than 35 programs. In 2006, he was awarded the Richard W. Lyman Award for exceptional volunteer service to alumni. Last year, he was awarded the School of Humanities and Sciences 2013 Lifetime Teaching Award.

5:10 p.m.

Break

5:30 p.m.

Seminars & Workshops Repeated

Take two! Seminars and workshops repeat so you can choose one more.

6:30 p.m.

Reception

Keep the connections going! Enjoy drinks and heavy hors d'oeuvres with new Stanford friends of all ages.

Look Who Connected

First Name Maiden Name Last Name Degree(s) Parent Year(s) City State
Kathleen O'Hanlon Peterson '82 P '15 Newport Coast CA
Ceyhun Akcay MS '13 San Diego CA
Leila Ahlstrom San Diego CA
Tom Hornbeak '72 P '08 Cardiff by the Sea CA
Alex Nickelberry Chula Vista CA

Special thanks to all the Stanford+Connects San Diego Connectors without whose help this event would not have been possible. See all local connectors.

Student Ambassadors

No Stanford event would be complete without students. That’s why these star scholars—who also happen to be athletes, activists, entrepreneurs, artists and so on—were invited to join you as your student ambassadors for the day. They’re looking forward to connecting with you, so don’t be shy!

Matthew Billman

Matthew Billman, ’15, is a human biology major straddling the fields of music and medicine. When not writing and performing music with the Fleet Street Singers, Matthew splits his time between the Margaret Fuller DevBio Lab, the MemAud stage (he starred last year as Jean Valjean in the Ram’s Head production of Les Miserables), and the CCRMA recording studio. Following graduation, Matthew will pursue a career as a surgeon and/or a pop/classical crossover singer. (Hopefully “and.”)

Maria Filsinger Interrante

Maria Filsinger Interrante, ’16, is majoring in bioengineering and plans to pursue her MD/PhD after graduating. She dreams of one day becoming a professor. When not in lab doing honors thesis research, Maria loves riding horses at the Red Barn with the Stanford Equestrian Team, volunteering as an EMT, and leading the Stanford Society of Women Engineers. A part-time tutor and ACT Prep Book author, Maria also loves teaching, tutoring, and mentoring younger students. Outside of academics, she's passionate about dancing, photography, and distance running and hopes to complete her first marathon before starting graduate school.

Rebekah Garcia

Rebekah Garcia, ’16, is a management science and engineering major with a passion for the finance industry and the non-profit sector. In addition to taking classes at the Graduate School of Business this fall, Rebekah mentors low-income high school seniors as part of the the Phoenix Scholars Program as and serves as Volunteer Manager for the Heart and Home Collaborative Women’s Shelter. She is also the Logistics Chair of the Stanford Alumni Council, and is thrilled to be a student ambassador.

Matt Horton

Matt Horton, MA ’16, is a first-year Master's student studying Music, Science, and Technology at Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). Originally from Owasso, Oklahoma, Matt has trained as a vocalist for 17 years and has had the opportunity to sing with artists such as Chanticleer, Ola Gjeilo, Morten Lauridsen, and Dr. Z Randall Stroope. Before Stanford, Matt studied Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering at Oklahoma State University.

Lauryn Isford

Lauryn Isford, ’15, is a senior majoring in management science and engineering. When she’s not in class, Lauryn can be found playing steel drums with Cardinal Calypso, training for her first half-marathon, and serving as president of Stanford Women in Business, aimed at empowering Stanford women to pursue business careers after graduation. She is also a Mayfield Fellow, and spent her summer learning about product management at a startup dedicated to smart social networking. 

Matthew Leong

Matthew Leong, ’17, is a sophomore studying computer science who hails from Piedmont and is the only Stanford member of a Cal alumni family. His hobbies include ultimate Frisbee, running the Dish, and enjoying the late night dining options at the campus dining halls; he is also a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. Matthew spent the summer working for a tech startup in New York City as well as Shorenstein Company in San Francisco.

Jason Okonofua

Jason Okonofua, PhD ’15, studies psychology with an emphasis on large-scale change in motivation and behavior. His research focuses on how psychological processes can affect professional relationships. Jason collaborates with and consults for K-12 schools and colleges throughout the Bay Area. He also guest lectures at San Quentin Federal Prison, and mentors undergraduate and graduate students through a variety of programs.

Daimen Sagastume

Daimen Sagastume, ’17, is studying biology and hopes to become a pediatrician in the years to come. During his first year on the Farm, Daimen explored the seemingly endless opportunities at Stanford and became involved with Frosh Council and the Student Alumni Council, as well as Camp Kesem and Math Magic (nonprofit organizations focused on working with children). In his free time, Daimen enjoys running, body-surfing, rock climbing, and graphic design.

Anita Tseng

Anita Tseng, PhD ’18, is a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Education in the science curriculum and teacher education program. She is currently researching the ways students reason with flawed claims about science, and how to improve students’ skills at critically assessing misinformation. Previously, Anita taught at a high school in New York, where she founded an Asian culture club that produced yearly performance art shows. She also volunteers as a mentor for the School of Education's Partnerships Program, advising first-year graduate students. Anita's favorite experience at Stanford has been with the teacher education program, in which she has instructed and supported pre-service teachers, and hopes to continue this after graduation. In her free time, she loves running with her dog on the Bay Trail, hiking the Sierras, trying new recipes, and doing custom woodwork with her fiancé.

Stay Connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

About Stanford+Connects

Stanford+Connects was a 16-city event tour that helped alumni re-experience Stanford (minus the midterms), multiply their networks and stretch their brain in infinite ways.