We came

Attendees
326
Connectors
75

326 Stanford alumni, parents and guests connected in Shanghai, and 75 Connectors helped make it happen.

We saw

We hope you learned and shared a lot at Stanford+Connects.

 

We connected

Who did you connect with?

Stay connected

The event may be over but your new connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

Shanghai Connectors smile for the camera.

Schedule - Saturday, March 12, 2016

12:45 p.m.

CHECK IN & MEET UP

Pick up your name tag and enjoy some light refreshments with fellow alumni.

1:15 p.m.

FIND A SEAT

1:30 p.m.

WELCOME

Howard E. Wolf, ’80, Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association

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Howard has led the Stanford Alumni Association and its staff since 2001. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology, with distinction, from Stanford in 1980 and his MBA from Harvard in 1985. Before his appointment as Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association, he worked as both an entrepreneur and business manager in the publishing and commercial real estate development and management industries. An active alum and volunteer, as well as an avid Stanford athletics fan, he received the Stanford Associates Outstanding Achievement Award in 2000. In addition to his Alumni Association role, Howard is one of eight officers of the University and part of its senior management team, with particular responsibility for advising the University's president and the provost on alumni affairs.

PRESIDENTIAL REMARKS AND Q&A

John L. Hennessy, President, Stanford University

Before stepping down after 16 years of remarkable service, the President of Stanford University shares his thoughts on Stanford and answers your questions.

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President of Stanford University since 2000, John L. Hennessy is the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. He joined the faculty in 1977 and since then has served as chair of computer science, dean of the School of Engineering and provost. A pioneer in computer architecture, his technology revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. He has lectured and published widely and co-authored two textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy has received numerous honors, including the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award.

2:25 p.m.

Micro Lectures

Five short talks on a variety of topics.

Are We Free to Decide?

Bill Newsome is the Harman Family Provostial Professor, the Vincent V.C. Woo Director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and a professor of neurobiology and, by courtesy, of psychology.

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A leading investigator in sensory and cognitive neuroscience, Professor Newsome teaches graduate and medical courses in neuroscience, and co-teaches an undergraduate course on social and ethical issues in the neurosciences. The long-term goal of his lab’s research is to understand the neuronal processes that mediate visual perception and visually guided behavior. Professor Newsome’s honors include the Rank Prize for Optoelectronics, the Spencer Award for highly original contributions to research in neurobiology, the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Dan David Prize and the Karl Lashley Award of the American Philosophical Society.

Maintaining Privacy in the Internet of Things

Monica Lam is a professor of computer science and faculty director of the Mobile-Social Computing Laboratory (MobiSocial).

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Professor Lam is co-principal investigator in the National Science Foundation-sponsored Programmable Open Mobile Internet 2020 Expedition. Her current research interest is in privacy, open social platforms and internet of things. She is an author of the most popular textbook in compilers, commonly known as the Dragon Book. She is an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow and served on the advisory committee for Institute of Information Science, Academia Sinica in Taiwan.

Freshman Year All Over Again: Life in China

Josh Freedman, ’11, majored in public policy with a focus on ethics and was a 2014-15 Luce Scholar in Beijing.

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Josh Freedman is currently research manager at China Policy, a Beijing-based research firm, and specializes in examining social policy change in China. He previously served as policy analyst with the Economic Growth Program at New America, a think tank in Washington, DC, where he also wrote a column for Forbes online about higher education. At Stanford, Josh received the Ann C. Seminara Prize for Outstanding Senior in Public Policy and wrote, acted and produced comedy with the Robber Barons, Stanford's sketch comedy troupe. His writing has appeared in a variety of publications including Washington Monthly, The Atlantic and McSweeney's, and he is the only person in the Beijing stand-up comedy circuit who makes jokes about commodity prices and the 13th five-year plan.

Understanding American Foreign Policy Debates

Michael McFaul, ’86, MA ’86, is a professor of political science, director and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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He has served the Obama administration as Special Assistant to the President, Senior Director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council at the White House, and most recently as the U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation. Professor McFaul has written and edited several books on international relations and foreign policy, and his op-ed writings have been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. As a NBC News analyst, he provides expertise on foreign affairs and national security coverage.

(VIDEO) The Racetrack as Classroom

J. Christian Gerdes is an associate professor of mechanical engineering, director of the Center for Automotive Research (CARS) and director of the Revs Program at Stanford.

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Professor Gerdes' laboratory studies how cars move, how humans drive cars and how to design future cars that work cooperatively with the driver or drive themselves. When not teaching on campus, he can often be found at the racetrack with students, instrumenting historic race cars or trying out their latest prototypes for the future. Vehicles in the lab include X1, an entirely student-built test vehicle, and Shelley, an Audi TT-S capable of turning a competitive lap time around the track without a human driver. Professor Gerdes and his team have been recognized with a number of awards including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the Ralph Teetor award from SAE International and the Rudolf Kalman Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

3:30 p.m.

BREAK

4:00 p.m.

SEMINARS I

Choose one of four seminars.

STANFORD DEAN DISCUSSION - ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Stanford continues to be a leader in the field of entrepreneurship, both domestically and abroad. Three deans (Persis Drell of the School of Engineering, Garth Saloner of the Graduate School of Business, and M. Elizabeth Magill of the Law School), in conversation with Lisa Lapin from the Office of Public Affairs, discuss how student interest in entrepreneurship expresses itself at each school, and how the related focus on innovation and creativity position these schools in the world of higher education.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: Explaining the New Confrontation between Russia and the West

Michael McFaul, '86, MA '86, is a professor of political science, director and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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In this seminar, Professor McFaul will draw on social science theory as well as his personal experiences in government to assess the causes of the current confrontation between Russia and the West. He will focus on long-term historical factors over the role of individual leaders.
 
He has served the Obama administration as Special Assistant to the President, Senior Director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council at the White House and, most recently, as the U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation. Professor McFaul has written and edited several books on international relations and foreign policy, and his op-ed writings have been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. As an NBC News analyst, he provides expertise on foreign affairs and national security coverage.

NEUROSCIENCE: Brains, Biology and Free Will

Bill Newsome is the Harman Family Provostial Professor, the Vincent V.C. Woo Director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and a professor of neurobiology and, by courtesy, of psychology.

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What really shapes our decisions: bottom-up, subconscious influences or top-down, conscious goals and desires? Professor Newsome discusses how research in neuroscience, psychology and philosophy is shedding new light on this age-old question, and why it matters.
 
A leading investigator in sensory and cognitive neuroscience, Professor Newsome teaches graduate and medical courses in neuroscience and co-teaches an undergraduate course on social and ethical issues in the neurosciences. The long-term goal of his lab’s research is to understand the neuronal processes that mediate visual perception and visually guided behavior. Professor Newsome’s honors include the Rank Prize for Optoelectronics, the Spencer Award for highly original contributions to research in neurobiology, the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Dan David Prize and the Karl Lashley Award of the American Philosophical Society.

PRIVACY & TECHNOLOGY: Disrupting Proprietary Social Networks

Monica Lam is a professor of computer science and faculty director of the Mobile-Social Computing Laboratory (MobiSocial).

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Social networking companies today not only lay claim to our personal communication, they also lock out their competitors. Professor Lam will explore the emergence of an open social ecosystem that lets users own their data and companies compete openly.
 
Professor Lam is co-principal investigator in the National Science Foundation-sponsored Programmable Open Mobile Internet 2020 Expedition. Her current research interest is in privacy, open social platforms and internet of things. She is an author of the most popular textbook in compilers, commonly known as the Dragon Book. She is an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow and served on the advisory committee for Institute of Information Science, Academia Sinica in Taiwan.

5:00 p.m.

BREAK

5:30 p.m.

SEMINARS II

The seminars repeat; choose another to attend.

6:30 p.m.

Reception

Enjoy cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, and great conversation.

Look Who Connected

First Name Last Name Degree(s) Parent Year(s) City Country
Tom Dwyer Shanghai China
Ruixiang Yang P '19 Los Angeles USA
Sophie Wong MS '98 Shanghai China
Catherine Kwong MS '96 Hong Kong Hong Kong
Jorgen Hoeven Shanghai China

Special thanks to all the Stanford+Connects Shanghai Connectors without whose help this event would not be possible. See all local connectors.

About Stanford+Connects

Stanford+Connects was a 16-city event tour that helped alumni re-experience Stanford (minus the midterms), multiply their networks and stretch their brain in infinite ways.