We came

Attendees
767
Connectors
146

767 Stanford alumni and guests connected in Washington, DC, and 146 Connectors helped make it happen.

We saw

Who were the stars of Stanford+Connects? Professors, President Hennessy... and you!

We connected

Who did you connect with? Find and tag your friends!

Stay connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

Washington, DC Connectors smile for the camera.

Schedule - Saturday, September 26, 2015

12:45 p.m.

CHECK IN & MEET UP

Pick up your name tag, grab some coffee and a light bite, and start connecting with your fellow alums.

1:15 p.m.

FIND A SEAT

1:30 p.m.

WELCOME

Howard E. Wolf, ’80, Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association

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Howard has led the Stanford Alumni Association and its staff since 2001. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology, with distinction, from Stanford in 1980 and his MBA from Harvard in 1985. Before his appointment as Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association, he worked as both an entrepreneur and business manager in the publishing and commercial real estate development and management industries. An active alum and volunteer, as well as an avid Stanford athletics fan, he received the Stanford Associates Outstanding Achievement Award in 2000. In addition to his Alumni Association role, Howard is one of eight officers of the University and part of its senior management team, with particular responsibility for advising the University's president and the provost on alumni affairs.

PRESIDENTIAL REMARKS AND Q&A

John L. Hennessy, President, Stanford University

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President of Stanford University since 2000, John L. Hennessy is the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. He joined the faculty in 1977 and since then has served as chair of computer science, dean of the School of Engineering and provost. A pioneer in computer architecture, his technology revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. He has lectured and published widely and co-authored two textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy has received numerous honors, including the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award.

2:25 p.m.

EVENT HOST

Dan Klein, ’90, is a lecturer in theater and performance studies and at the Graduate School of Business, and he's on the teaching team at the d.school.

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Klein’s teaching taps into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. A longtime improv instructor of beginning and advanced improvisation, he has helped create student groups including the Robber Barons (original sketch comedy), the Flying Treehouse (children’s theater) and Stanford Improvisors, an improv troupe that has performed on campus and in the community for 25 years.

Micro lectures

These bite-size lectures will get your brain buzzing.

Can the U.S. Pursue Interests and Values at the Same Time?

Michael McFaul, ’86, MA ’86, is a professor of political science, director and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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He has served the Obama administration as Special Assistant to the President, Senior Director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council at the White House, and most recently as the U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation. Professor McFaul has written and edited several books on international relations and foreign policy, and his op-ed writings have been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.

Toward a Healthy and Sustainable Federal School Lunch Program

Maria Deloso, ’15, MS ’16, is an Earth Systems master's student focused on sustainable, healthy and equitable food systems.

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Although she graduated from high school in Pasadena, CA, Maria has lived in over seven locations, including McLean, VA and London, England. Maria recently finished her undergraduate degree in Earth Systems with a minor in Economics. During Winter quarter 2013-14, Maria participated in the Stanford in Washington program and worked at the U.S. Department of Agriculture on child nutrition programs. Wanting to gain a fuller perspective on child hunger in America, she later interned at a school food company aiding with the culinary development process and served the meals to elementary and middle school children. At Stanford, Maria is a sustainable food program intern for Stanford Dining. In her spare time, she enjoys reading and visiting grocery stores and farmers markets.

The Chosen Exile of Racial Passing

Allyson Hobbs is an assistant professor of history.

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Her research interests include American cultural history, identity formation, and migration. Professor Hobbs teaches courses on African American history, African American women's history, and twentieth century American history. Her teaching has garnered awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize, the Graves Award in the Humanities, and the St. Clair Drake Outstanding Teaching Award from the Program in African and African American Studies. Professor Hobbs’s debut book, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, explores the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States. A Chosen Exile won the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for best first book in American history and the Lawrence Levine Prize for best book in American cultural history.

Advocating for Marriage Equality in the U.S. Supreme Court

Sam Byker, JD/MBA ’17, is a second year law student recently involved with the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic.

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Originally from Los Angeles, he graduated from Brown University with a degree in Economics and American History. After that, he worked for three years at the Boston Consulting Group and as a field organizer for the 2012 Obama Campaign. Outside of class, Sam teaches criminal law to incarcerated youth as Co-President of Streetlaw. Last year, he worked at the California Attorney General’s Office to develop re-entry programs for state prisoners. In his spare time, Sam enjoys hiking, kayaking, and searching the peninsula for a good burrito.

The Magic of Bird Flight

David Lentink is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and member of Bio-X, an interdisciplinary biosciences institute at Stanford.

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Professor Lentink’s multidisciplinary lab studies biological flight—bird flight in particular—as an inspiration for engineering design. He serves as a member of the Young Academy of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the Dutch Academic Year Prize for the Flight Artists, in which Professor Lentink crowdsourced high-speed camera footage to capture flight movements. In 2013, the World Economic Forum named him one of 40 scientists under 40. His publications range from technical journals to cover publications in Nature and Science.

3:30 p.m.

BREAK

4:00 p.m.

Seminars

Choose one of eight in-depth seminars for an intellectual deep dive.

AMERICAN IDENTITY: Who Are You? The Fluidity of Race in History

Allyson Hobbs is an assistant professor of history.

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From Sally Hemings to Barack Obama, Americans have experienced, represented and contested identity in fascinating ways. This seminar examines major transformations throughout our nation’s history that have shaped our understanding of both racial identity and American identity.

Professor Hobbs’s research interests include American cultural history, identity formation and migration. She teaches courses on African American history, African American women's history, and twentieth century American history. Her teaching has garnered awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize, the Graves Award in the Humanities, and the St. Clair Drake Outstanding Teaching Award from the Program in African and African American Studies. Professor Hobbs’s debut book A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life explores the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States. A Chosen Exile won the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for best first book in American history and the Lawrence Levine Prize for best book in American cultural history.

ART & CULTURE: What is an Artist?

Alexander Nemerov is the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities.

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Why would someone make a work of art? Is it all about “personal expression” or making a “statement”? Discover the more urgent reasons and mad mysteries that lead a person to make a work of art, and to become an artist.

A scholar of American art, he explores the presence of art and the recollection of past, and the importance of the humanities in our lives today. Professor Nemerov teaches art history, topics in American visual culture and the history of American photography. He curated the exhibition To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America featured in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. His recent book Wartime Kiss: Visions of the Moment in the 1940s looks at American visual culture during World War II. His newest book, Silent Dialogues: Diane Arbus and Howard Nemerov, is about the artistic relationship between his aunt, the photographer Diane Arbus, and his father, the poet Howard Nemerov.

BIO-FLIGHT: How Understanding Bird Flight Informs Engineering

David Lentink is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and member of Bio-X, an interdisciplinary biosciences institute at Stanford.

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What enables birds to turn on a dime? How can even the simplest organisms fly with stability in turbulence? The Lentink lab uses innovative techniques to study these mysteries of animal flight. These insights inform better design approaches to engineering flying robots.

Professor Lentink’s multidisciplinary lab studies biological flight—bird flight in particular—as an inspiration for engineering design. He serves as a member of the Young Academy of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the Dutch Academic Year Prize for the Flight Artists, in which Professor Lentink crowdsourced high-speed camera footage to capture flight movements. In 2013, the World Economic Forum named him one of 40 scientists under 40. His publications range from technical journals to cover publications in Nature and Science.

DESIGN YOUR LIFE: What Do You Want to Be (When You Grow Up)?

Bill Burnett, ’79, MS ’82, is a consulting assistant professor in mechanical engineering and the executive director of the Stanford Design Program (d.school).

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In this hands-on workshop, you’ll gain tools and ideas for reframing your life’s odyssey. Whether you are happy with your job, preparing for a career pivot or seeking more meaning, applying the principles of design thinking to your career and life will help invent a more interesting and fulfilling future “you.”

As the director of one of the oldest multi-disciplinary degree programs at Stanford, Professor Burnett combines art and engineering in sharing his joy of product design with several thousand students over his years at Stanford. He holds a number of mechanical and design patents as well as several design awards for his work at Apple in the 1990s. In addition to teaching, he serves on the board of VOZ, a socially responsible fashion start-up, and advises several other start-up companies.

GENDER & LEADERSHIP: Building More Inclusive Workplaces

Shelley Correll, MA ’96, PhD ’01, is a professor of sociology and organizational behavior and the Barbara D. Finberg Director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research.

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How can we increase the representation of women in leadership roles and create more inclusive workplaces where all people fully thrive? Professor Correll will share research on the way gender stereotypes limit women’s advancement and suggest strategies for minimizing or eliminating these biases.

An expert in the field of gender and workplace dynamics, Professor Correll has received numerous awards for her research on working mothers and their place in the workforce. She currently leads a nationwide project on “redesigning work” to better suit the modern workplace. Professor Correll also researches gender stereotypes and organizational practices that affect women in technical fields, and the growth of the craft beer industry and what it means for the success of women brewers.

IMPROVISATION WORKSHOP: Cultivating a Mindset for Creativity, Agility and Resourcefulness

Dan Klein, ’90, is a lecturer in theater and performance studies in the Graduate School of Business and a teacher at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (d.school).

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How often do you think and act outside of your own box? Lecturer Dan Klein taps into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. In this hands-on workshop, learn how to channel ideas and express them in a compelling way on demand—onstage and beyond.

Klein’s teaching taps into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. A longtime improv instructor of beginning and advanced improvisation, he has helped create student groups including the Robber Barons (original sketch comedy), the Flying Treehouse (children’s theater) and Stanford Improvisors, an improv troupe that has performed on campus and in the community for more than 20 years.

 

INFECTIOUS DISEASES: Preventing and Predicting New Threats

Bonnie Maldonado, MD ’81, is a professor of pediatrics (infectious diseases) and health research and policy as well as senior associate dean for faculty development and diversity at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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It seems that there are outbreaks of old and new diseases on a regular basis in the U.S. and worldwide.  Why are we seeing these emerging and re-emerging diseases despite our modern medical advances? Professor Bonnie Maldonado explores the nature of these diseases, what leads to an outbreak, and how society can protect itself.

Professor Maldonado has led a number of domestic and international pediatric vaccine studies, as well as studies in the prevention and treatment of perinatal HIV infection in the United States, India, Mexico and Africa. Her research projects include investigating the dynamics of oral poliovirus vaccine in Mexico, serving as the co-director of Zimbabwe AIDS Prevention Project, and devoting substantial time to teaching and mentoring current Stanford medical students.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: Confronting Putin's Russia

Michael McFaul, ’86, MA ’86, is a professor of political science, director and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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In this seminar, Professor McFaul will draw on both social science theory as well as his personal experiences in government to assess the causes of the current confrontation between Russia and the West. In developing an explanation, he will focus on the relative weight of long-term historical factors versus the role of individual leaders.

He has served the Obama administration as Special Assistant to the President, Senior Director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council at the White House, and most recently as the U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation. Professor McFaul has written and edited several books on international relations and foreign policy, and his op-ed writings have been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.

5:00 p.m.

BREAK

5:30 p.m.

Seminars Repeated

Take two! Seminars repeat so you can choose one more.

6:30 p.m.

Reception

Keep the connections going! Enjoy drinks and heavy hors d'oeuvres with new Stanford friends of all ages.

Look Who Connected

First Name Maiden Name Last Name Degree(s) Parent Year(s) City State
Seth Nosanchuk Silver Spring MD
Patricia Marby Harrison '91 Arlington VA
Kathy Bodovitz Goldgeier '83 Rockville MD
Mark Kogan '09 Washington DC
Art Varnado '82, MBA '87 Ellicott City MD

Special thanks to all the Stanford+Connects Washington, DC Connectors without whose help this event would not be possible. See all local connectors.

Student Ambassadors

No Stanford event would be complete without students. That’s why these star scholars—who also happen to be athletes, activists, entrepreneurs, artists, Stanford in Washington participants, and so on—were invited to join you as your student ambassadors for the day. They’re looking forward to connecting with you, so don’t be shy!

Raúl Hasbún Avalos

Raúl Hasbún Avalos, ’16, is a senior majoring in political science. At Stanford, his favorite class has been “Fixing U.S. Politics: Political Reform in Principle and Practice,” taught by Professor Bruce Cain. Raúl is a coordinator for Stanford's Admit Weekend and a Delta Tau Delta fraternity brother. He also works with a leadership resources company doing leadership training and program management for career and technical student organizations nationwide. He was born in San Salvador, El Salvador, and spent his early childhood there before immigrating with his family to the US and settling in Concord, California.

Sam Byker

Sam Byker, JD ’17, MBA ’17, is a third year law student in a joint MBA program recently involved with the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. Originally from Los Angeles, he graduated from Brown University with a degree in economics and American history. After that, he worked for three years at the Boston Consulting Group and as a field organizer for the 2012 Obama Campaign. Outside of class, Sam teaches criminal law to incarcerated youth as co-president of Streetlaw. Last year, he worked at the California Attorney General’s Office to develop re-entry programs for state prisoners. In his spare time, Sam enjoys hiking, kayaking, and searching the peninsula for a good burrito.

Maria Deloso

Maria Deloso, ’15, MS ’18, is an Earth systems master’s student focused on sustainable, healthy and equitable food systems. Although she graduated from high school in Pasadena, CA, Maria has lived everywhere from Louisville, KY to London, England. During winter quarter 2013-14, Maria participated in the Stanford in Washington program and worked at the U.S. Department of Agriculture on child nutrition programs. She also interned at a school food company where she was part of the culinary development process and served meals to elementary and middle school children. Maria is currently taking a leave of absence to work at Bon Appétit Management Company, an on-site restaurant company located by the Palo Alto Caltrain station.

Sarah Hirshorn

Sarah Hirshorn, ’17, is a junior majoring in public policy with a self-designed concentration in social entrepreneurship and is a member of the lightweight rowing team. As a freshman, she founded a team service project called Project S.W.E.E.P. Her favorite classes at Stanford have been through the d.school and Graduate School of Business. Sarah was raised in West Harrison, NY and is the second oldest of six children. She graduated salutatorian from Convent of the Sacred Heart in Greenwich, CT.

Matt Jeakle

Matt Jeakle, ’17, is a junior from Seattle majoring in American studies, with a minor in creative writing. Matt is an active member of Stanford’s Stand Up Comedy Group (Stand Up, D) and its spinoff sketch comedy group (Sketch, D). He also writes for the Flipside, the satirical newspaper on campus, and for the Stanford Sitcom Project; to round out his comedy portfolio, he joined the Stanford Improvisers in 2015. Matt enjoys spending his free time watching cartoons and eating cereal.

Bryant Johnson

Bryant Johnson, ’17, is a junior majoring in political science. A native of Covington, Georgia, Bryant has immersed himself in Stanford culture. His favorite class thus far has been “Governing the Global Economy,” taught by his advisor Kenneth Scheve. Bryant is interested in the intersectionality of law and finance, an interest that he hopes will lead to a career in transactional law. He is a Program Coordinator at the Black Community Services Center, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., an analyst for the Stanford Blyth Fund, and still finds time to play the piano when possible.

Staci Lewis

Staci Lewis, is a second-year PhD student whose work investigates the impact of human activity on Micronesian coral reef systems, with special emphasis on the role of science and traditional knowledge in management decisions and the use of proteomics (the study of proteins) to diagnose coral health. She came to Stanford after 8 years working in Washington, DC to incorporate science into policy and legislation. During her tenure in DC, Staci earned a master’s degree in environmental science and public policy from George Mason University, and prior to that Staci was a Fulbright Fellow in Barbados. Staci is excited to have this opportunity at Stanford to bring together her 6 years of coral reef research and 8 years of policy experience in the pursuit of her doctorate. She also is ecstatic to be back in DC to share these experiences and to help Stanford connect!

Nuriel Moghavem

Nuriel Moghavem, MD ’17, is a health policy wonk interested in clinical neurology and in advancing the health and welfare of his community. After finishing his clinical coursework at the medical school, he will spend this upcoming year in Sacramento as a staffer in the office of Richard Gordon (D-Menlo Park) in an effort to better understand public policy, especially as it pertains to health. His research uses big data to investigate post-surgical outcomes and the mechanisms that may influence them. Nuriel is currently the Chair of the California Medical Association's Medical Student Section and is a voting Delegate of the American Medical Association's House of Delegates. In his free time, he enjoys reading, playing soccer, and working on his first novel.

Malaika Murphy-Sierra

Malaika Murphy-Sierra, ’17, is a DC area native and an active participant in the arts community at Stanford. She is a member of the Stanford Improvisors (SImps) and the Stanford Shakespeare Company, and loves to act and sing in her favorite Stanford tradition—Gaieties. Her psychology major has let her explore her passion for children by letting her teach at the Bing Nursery School, and her favorite class has been the popular “Human Behavioral Biology” taught by Robert Sapolsky. She also enjoys being a coordinator for Camp Kesem—an organization that provides a free week of camp for children affected by a parent's cancer. She hopes to connect with you about storytelling, improvising, brains, spirituality, theater, comedy, and nature.

Rachel Samuels

Rachel Samuels, ’17, is a junior majoring in international relations with a minor in comparative studies in race and ethnicity. During her time at Stanford, she has served as an undergraduate senator, an executive campaign manager, and an executive chief of staff in ASSU. Rachel has returned spring quarter from her two quarters off-campus at Stanford in Washington and at Stanford in Cape Town. Outside of Stanford, Rachel is an eighth-year presenter and participant at the White Privilege Conference, a diversity conference that engages conversation and action around identity privilege and oppression.

Carey Smith

Carey Smith, MFA ’16, is a Colorado native currently enrolled in the Graduate Design Program; he also spent nine years living in Seattle before arriving at Stanford. His favorite part of campus is the Product Realization Lab, where he can design and build out his crazy ideas. Carey Plays rugby with the graduate rugby club in his free time.

Micaela Suminski

Micaela Suminski, ’17, is a junior who loves reading the news, debating, and drinking coffee. A Philadelphia native and urban studies major, she focuses on race relations, education policy, and housing policy. Three highlights of her Stanford career have been leading an Alternative Spring Break trip during sophomore year that focused on the school-to-prison pipeline, working at the U.S. Department of Education during her junior fall quarter with the Stanford in Washington program, and spending a quarter in Cape Town, South Africa through the Bing Overseas Studies Program. Micaela also rocks out with the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band, organizes for the Stanford Political Journal and ignitED, and enjoys running outdoors.

Ameena Tawakol

Ameena Tawakol, ’17, is a junior majoring in economics with a focus on international development and a minor in French. Her favorite class at Stanford so far has been a service-learning course, “Social Entrepreneurship and the Advancement of Democracy, Development and Justice.” The class inspired her to continue studying economic growth in developing countries. Ameena serves on the Board of Directors of Stanford in Government and as the co-president of the Muslim Student Union; she also enjoys running with the Stanford Running Club and other outdoor activities. She loves to travel, especially anywhere with a beach.

Jennifer Wang

Jennifer Wang is currently a PhD student with the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER), supported by a Stanford Graduate Fellowship. While her interests lie broadly in studying human behavior, her current research looks at normative business attitudes and behaviors regarding environmental sustainability and climate change. Originally from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, since coming to Stanford she has started three student initiatives, including the Stanford Environment and Behaviour student group, and was selected as part of the 2014 cohort of the Stanford Rising Environmental Leaders Program, as well as the 2014-2015 Stanford Graduate Voice & Influence Program for women leaders.  She is also an accomplished pianist and chamber musician, and enjoys drawing absurdist cartoons, running outdoors, and curling up in warm bunnyhugs (non-Saskatchewan natives might know these as ‘hoodies’) in her spare time.

Stay Connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

About Stanford+Connects

Stanford+Connects was a 16-city event tour that helped alumni re-experience Stanford (minus the midterms), multiply their networks and stretch their brain in infinite ways.