We came

Attendees
1,052
Connectors
169

1,052 Stanford alumni and guests connected in New York, and 169 Connectors helped make it happen.

We saw

Who were the stars of Stanford+Connects? Professors, President Hennessy... and you!

We connected

Who did you connect with? Find and tag your friends!

Stay connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

New York Connectors smile for the camera.

Schedule — Saturday, September 27, 2014

12:30 p.m.

Check In & Meet Up

Pick up your name tag, grab some coffee and a light bite, and start connecting with your fellow alums.

1:00 p.m.

Find A Seat

1:15 p.m.

Welcome

Howard E. Wolf, '80, Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association

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Howard has led the Stanford Alumni Association and its staff since 2001. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology, with distinction, from Stanford in 1980 and his MBA from Harvard in 1985. Before his appointment as Vice President for Alumni Affairs and President, Stanford Alumni Association, he worked as both an entrepreneur and business manager in the publishing and commercial real estate development and management industries. An active alum and volunteer, as well as an avid Stanford athletics fan, he received the Stanford Associates Outstanding Achievement Award in 2000. In addition to his Alumni Association role, Howard is one of eight officers of the University and part of its senior management team, with particular responsibility for advising the University's president and the provost on alumni affairs.

Presidential Remarks and Q&A

John L. Hennessy, President, Stanford University

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President of Stanford University since 2000, John L. Hennessy is the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. He joined the faculty in 1977 and since then has served as chair of computer science, dean of the School of Engineering and provost. A pioneer in computer architecture, his technology revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. He has lectured and published widely and co-authored two textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy has received numerous honors, including the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award.

2:10 p.m.

Event Host

Dan Klein, '90, is a lecturer in theater and performance studies and at the Graduate School of Business, and he's on the teaching team at the d.school.

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Dan Klein teaches workshops at the d. school on improv and design for interdisciplinary graduate students. He delivers programs that tap into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. He also directs the Stanford Improvisors, a 19-year-old improv troupe that performs on campus and in the community. In 2009, students named him Stanford Teacher of the Year.

Micro Lectures

These bite-size lectures will get your brain buzzing.

Infinite Reality: The Dawn of the Virtual Revolution

Jeremy Bailenson is the founding director of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab, an associate professor of communication and a senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment.

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Jeremy Bailenson explores the manner in which people are able to represent themselves when the physical constraints of body and vertically-rendered behaviors are removed. He also designs and studies virtual reality systems that allow physically remote individuals to meet in virtual space, and explores the manner in which these systems change the nature of verbal and nonverbal interaction. His findings have been published in more than 90 academic papers in the fields of communication, computer science, education, law, political science and psychology. 

The Digitally Empowered Patient

Stacie Vilendrer, ’08, MD ’15, MBA ’15, is a graduate student focused on bioinformatics and preventative health.

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Stacie Vilendrer is pursuing an MBA and an MD after having received an undergraduate degree in human biology. Her experiences overseas and at home have highlighted the importance of preventing and managing chronic diseases; her goal now is to bring primary care and preventive medicine to underserved patients. Stacie seeks to help startup companies harness the power of digital and mobile technology for patients. Outside Stanford, she runs a free clinic for local communities and has trained medical workers in Tanzania and India. 

The End of Race As We Know It?

Michele Elam is the Olivier Nomellini Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and professor of English.

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Michele Elam has published widely on race, literature and culture and her scholarly books include The Souls of Mixed Folk: Race, Politics & Aesthetics in the New Millennium and Race, Work and Desire in American Literature, 1860-1930. Affiliated with both the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Studies and the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, she has served as the director of the Program in African & African American Studies and Director of Curriculum in English. Elam has received many awards for her teaching, twice the recipient of the St. Clair Drake Award for Outstanding Teaching from the Program in African and African American Studies, and the Faculty Award for “Outstanding Service to Undergraduate Students as a Teacher, Advisor and Mentor,” from the Program in Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity.

Thinking Outside the Bubble: Project-Based Learning in the 21st Century

Derek Ouyang, ’13, MS ’15, was the project manager of Stanford Solar Decathlon in 2013 and is currently a graduate student in structural engineering & geomechanics.

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Derek Ouyang graduated from Stanford University in 2013 with dual bachelor’s degrees in civil engineering and architectural design, and will return in the fall for a master’s in structural engineering. He was project manager of Stanford’s first-ever entry to the U.S. DOE’s 2013 Solar Decathlon and has been featured as an up-and-coming architect in the Los Angeles Times, in Home Energy magazine’s “30 under 30” and at TEDxStanford. He is now keeping himself busy as co-founder of Cloud Architecture, a young architectural practice working on projects all around the world.

Developing a Growth Mindset

Carol Dweck is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, at the Graduate School of Education.

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Carol Dweck is a leading expert in the field of motivation. Her research has demonstrated the role of mindsets in students’ achievement and has shown how praise for intelligence can undermine motivation and learning. She has lectured to education, business and sports groups all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. She has appeared on Today, Good Morning America, Nightline and 20/20. Her bestselling book Mindset has been widely acclaimed and translated into over 20 languages.

Radical Creativity: The Dilemma of Being Best and Worst

Mark Applebaum is an associate professor of music composition, the Hazy Family University Fellow and the Leland & Edith Smith Faculty Scholar.

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Mark Applebaum is known for bringing his playful dynamism and passion for music into the classroom. He teaches courses ranging from music theory to rock history, and directs [sic]--the Stanford Improvisation Collective. For the past 25 years, he has invented instruments by mounting assorted items to soundboards and playing them with everything from chopsticks to knitting needles. Professor Applebaum's music ranges from solo to orchestral works, electronic pieces to musical theater. His compositions challenge conventional musical ontology: a concerto for florist, works for three conductors and no players, choreographed hand gestures, etc. He has received commissions from Betty Freeman, the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Harvard's Fromm Foundation, the Paul Dresher Ensemble, and the Vienna Modern Festival, among others.

3:30 p.m.

Break

4:00 p.m.

Seminars & Workshops

Choose one of ten in-depth seminars for an intellectual deep dive, or opt for an interactive workshop.

ARTISTIC INNOVATION - Problems in the Critique and Appreciation of Artistic Innovation

Mark Applebaum is an associate professor of music composition, the Hazy Family University Fellow and the Leland & Edith Smith Faculty Scholar.

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How do we ascribe value to new or marginal artistic enterprise? Through live performances on old and new instruments—including his self-designed “mouseketier”—Professor Applebaum exposes students to the challenges facing audiences of new art forms.

Mark Applebaum is known for bringing his playful dynamism and passion for music into the classroom. He teaches courses ranging from music theory to rock history, and directs [sic]--the Stanford Improvisation Collective. For the past 25 years, he has invented instruments by mounting assorted items to soundboards and playing them with everything from chopsticks to knitting needles. Professor Applebaum's music ranges from solo to orchestral works, electronic pieces to musical theater. His compositions challenge conventional musical ontology: a concerto for florist, works for three conductors and no players, choreographed hand gestures, etc. He has received commissions from Betty Freeman, the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Harvard's Fromm Foundation, the Paul Dresher Ensemble, and the Vienna Modern Festival, among others.

VIRTUAL REALITY - Transforming Social Interactions with Virtual Reality

Jeremy Bailenson is the founding director of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab, an associate professor of communication and a senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment.

Read more

If you were to watch a 3D representation of yourself at age 85, would you feel more compelled to save for retirement? Professor Bailenson examines how virtual reality can change the way people think about health, the environment and education.

Jeremy Bailenson explores the manner in which people are able to represent themselves when the physical constraints of body and vertically-rendered behaviors are removed. He also designs and studies virtual reality systems that allow physically remote individuals to meet in virtual space, and explores the manner in which these systems change the nature of verbal and nonverbal interaction. His findings have been published in more than 90 academic papers in the fields of communication, computer science, education, law, political science and psychology. 

HEALTH REFORM - Pursuing an Excellent Health Care System

Laurence Baker is chief of health services research, a professor of health research and policy and a fellow of the Center for Health Policy.

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Is an excellent health care system possible? How do we adapt to changing demographics and take advantage of new medical technologies without breaking the bank? Professor Baker reports.

Laurence Baker is an economist interested in the organization and economic performance of the U.S. healthcare system. Professor Baker has been at Stanford since 1994 and taught health policy in different contexts over the years. He currently teaches in the HumBio core and in the MD curriculum, and directs the School of Medicine Scholarly Concentration program. He is a member of the board of directors of the International Health Economics Association and AcademyHealth, and has served as an advisor to a range of Federal and state health policy efforts. 

GLOBAL DEMOCRACY - Is There An Emerging Global Crisis of Democracy?

Larry Diamond, ’73, MA ’78, PhD ’80, is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law; and the Peter E. Haas Faculty co-director of the Haas Center for Public Service at Stanford.

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Since 1974, democracy has expanded worldwide. But with the instability of many young democracies, many wonder if a global crisis is impending. Professor Diamond examines democracy's future.

Larry Diamond teaches about comparative democratic development and post-conflict democracy building. In 2007, Professor Diamond was named Teacher of the Year and received the University's Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contributions to Undergraduate Education. His latest book, The Spirit of Democracy: The Struggle to Build Free Societies throughout the World, explores the sources of global democratic progress and the prospects for future democratic expansion.

MINDSETS - Why Brains and Talent Don’t Equal Success

Carol Dweck is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, at the Graduate School of Education.

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Are human basic attributes largely fixed or can they be developed? Professor Dweck demonstrates how what you believe can have profound implications for success in school, business, relationships and parenting.

Carol Dweck is a leading expert in the field of motivation. Her research has demonstrated the role of mindsets in students’ achievement and has shown how praise for intelligence can undermine motivation and learning. She has lectured to education, business and sports groups all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. She has appeared on Today, Good Morning America, Nightline and 20/20. Her bestselling book Mindset has been widely acclaimed and translated into over 20 languages.

RACE & IDENTITY - Perceptions of Race in a “Post-Race” World

Michele Elam is the Olivier Nomellini Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and professor of English.

Read more

Can we tell what someone's race is just by looking at the person? In this interactive workshop you’ll explore the complex ways we perceive race and ethnicity and why that matters in our everyday lives.

Michele Elam has published widely on race, literature and culture and her scholarly books include The Souls of Mixed Folk: Race, Politics & Aesthetics in the New Millennium and Race, Work and Desire in American Literature, 1860-1930. Affiliated with both the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Studies and the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, she has served as the director of the Program in African & African American Studies and Director of Curriculum in English. Elam has received many awards for her teaching, twice the recipient of the St. Clair Drake Award for Outstanding Teaching from the Program in African and African American Studies, and the Faculty Award for “Outstanding Service to Undergraduate Students as a Teacher, Advisor and Mentor,” from the Program in Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity.

POWER & INFLUENCE - Acting with Power

Deborah Gruenfeld is the Moghadam Family Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior.

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Want to make an impression? What you do, as opposed to what you say, can make all the difference. In this interactive workshop you’ll learn how to use nonverbal body language to manage impressions and make relationships work better.

Deborah Gruenfeld is a social psychologist. Her research examines how people respond to their own power and powerlessness. The author of numerous articles on power and on group behavior, Deborah teaches in many of Stanford’s executive education programs. She co-directs the Stanford Executive Program for Women Leaders, is a member of LeanIn.org’s board of directors and is developing a curriculum for educating women and girls in developing economies. Professor Gruenfeld joined the Stanford Graduate School of Business in 2000, where she has served as the area head of organizational behavior, a member of the dean’s advisory group, and a member of the MBA admissions advisory board. Before starting her academic career, she worked as a journalist and public relations consultant.  

NEUROSCIENCE - What's the Deal with the Obama BRAIN Initiative?

Bill Newsome is the Harman Family Provostial Professor, director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute and a professor of neurobiology and, by courtesy, of psychology.

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Novel technologies are changing the face of neuroscience in potentially revolutionary ways. Professor Newsome outlines new developments in the field and critical challenges still before us.

Bill Newsome is a leading investigator in sensory and cognitive neuroscience. He teaches graduate and medical courses in neuroscience, and co-teaches an undergraduate course on social and ethical issues in the neurosciences. Professor Newsome’s honors include the Rank Prize for Optoelectronics, the Spencer Award for highly original contributions to research in neurobiology, the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Dan David Prize and the Karl Lashley Award of the American Philosophical Society.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE - Building Smart Machines

Andrew Ng is an associate professor of computer science.

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How do you build a helicopter that can fly itself?  Professor Ng explores how computer systems that mimic the brain can help us build smart machines.

Andrew Ng is the former director of the Artificial Intelligence Lab. His research focuses on machine learning and robotics. His early work includes the Stanford Autonomous Helicopter project, which developed the world's most capable autonomous helicopter, and STAIR (Stanford Artificial Intelligence Robot), which led to a widely used open-source robotics software platform. In 2011, Professor Ng taught an online machine learning class to more than 100,000 students, leading to the founding of Coursera, an education platform partnering with top universities and organizations to offer free online courses.  In 2013, Ng was named one of Time’s 100 most influential people in the world.

CREATIVITY WORKOUT - Techniques for Sparking Your Creative Genius

Tina Seelig, PhD ’85, is a professor of the practice in management science and engineering and executive director for the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, the entrepreneurship center at the School of Engineering.

Dan Klein, ’90, is a lecturer in theater and performance studies and at the Graduate School of Business, and he’s on the teaching team at the d.school

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Limber up your brain, stretch your imagination and pump up your creativity in this interactive workshop co-taught by Professor Seelig and d.school improviser Dan Klein, ’90.

Tina Seelig, PhD ’85, teaches creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in the department of Management Science and Engineering and within the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, the d.school. Professor Seelig has written 16 popular books, including What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 and inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity. She is the recipient of several national awards, including the Gordon Prize from the National Academy of Engineering, recognizing her as national leader in engineering education. 

Dan Klein teaches workshops at the d.school on improv and design for interdisciplinary graduate students. He delivers programs that tap into improvisation, design thinking and high-performance communication to help adults access their childlike creative reserves. He also directs the Stanford Improvisors, a 19-year-old improv troupe that performs on campus and in the community. In 2009, students named him Stanford Teacher of the Year.

 

5:00 p.m.

Break

5:30 p.m.

Seminars & Workshops Repeated

Take two! Seminars and workshops repeat so you can choose one more.

6:30 p.m.

Reception

Keep the connections going! Enjoy drinks and heavy hors d'oeuvres with new Stanford friends of all ages.

Look Who Connected

1296 connected

First Name Maiden Name Last Name Degree(s) Parent Year(s) City State
Eduardo Rodriguez New York NY
Victornia Araromi Orange NJ
Nancy Henry MA '71 New York NY
Ghazal Badiozamani Beylin '99 Brooklyn NY
Stefanie Sobelle '95 New York NY

Special thanks to all the Stanford+Connects New York Connectors without whose help this event would not have been possible. See all local connectors.

Student Ambassadors

No Stanford event would be complete without students. That’s why 12 star scholars—who also happen to be athletes, activists, entrepreneurs, artists and so on—were invited to join you as your student ambassadors for the day. They’re looking forward to connecting with you, so don’t be shy!

 

Justin Brown

Justin Brown, ’15, is an urban studies major originally from the Washington, DC area. At Stanford, he has participated in tour guiding, improv and playing trombone in the Stanford Band. Justin studied abroad in Florence, Italy, for three months last spring and will be returning to Europe this August to research connections between street performing and urban design in Amsterdam. 

Emma Rose Coleman

Emma Rose Coleman, ’17, is a poet, artist, and activist majoring in international relations and comparative studies in race and ethnicity. Emma takes pride in being a founding member of MINT (Stanford's first fashion and culture magazine), competing for Stanford at the national collegiate poetry slam, and representing her hometown of Chicago with a fierce pride while on the West Coast. She was the 2012 and 2013 winner of Louder than a Bomb, Chicago's youth poetry slam.

Molly Fehr

Molly Fehr, ’15, has settled on political science and psychology after cycling through “about 15 other potential majors.” She can usually be found leading hordes of prospective freshmen around campus on tours, or enjoying her favorite Stanford tradition: fountain hopping. Molly is a former coxswain on the Stanford Women's Rowing team, and a member of Pi Beta Phi and the Student Alumni Council. 

Meghan Galligan

Meghan Galligan, MD ’15, is an East Coast transplant from New York who is entering her third year in the MD program. She graduated from Harvard College in 2010, having completed an honors track in neurobiology focusing on mind, brain and behavior. As an undergraduate, Meghan pursued developmental neurobiology research while performing in various orchestras and music groups. Before matriculating at Stanford, Meghan spent a postgraduate year working in malaria research. At Stanford she has conducted research in child and adolescent psychiatry.

Jessia Hoffman

Jessia Hoffman, ’15, is a senior majoring in English with an emphasis in creative writing and a minor in theater and performance studies. A Bay Area native, she spent last year studying in Madrid, where she picked up a Spanish minor, a love for the European lifestyle and an amazing Madrilenian mother. Though still investigating career paths, Jessia hopes to combine her passions for the performing arts, gender studies and social action. Jessia is a proud member of the Stanford Improvisors (SImps), as well as the theater, a cappella and Jewish communities on campus. She is currently researching and drafting an original play on Stanford social life, to be performed on campus this year as an honors thesis.

June Park John

June Park John, ’06, MS ’06, PhD ’19, is a first-year doctoral student at the Graduate School of Education in a joint program focusing on international comparative education and the economics of education. During her undergraduate years at Stanford, she was involved in Intervarsity Christian Fellowship and the East Palo Alto Stanford Academy. After graduating, she spent several years working and volunteering in East Palo Alto before venturing abroad with her husband (whom she met in her freshman dorm) to work at an education NGO in Indonesia. She couldn't resist the opportunity to return to Stanford to pursue a doctoral degree.

Michael Kim

Michael Kim, ’17, is the oldest of five children, the owner of many bow ties and a self-described “collector of wisdom.” He plans to major in computer science with a minor in modern languages or comparative literature. As a resident of Casa Zapata, he is deeply interested in Spanish language and culture; he spent summer teaching digital literacy classes and exploring the world in Lima, Peru. On campus, Michael is a former frosh council representative, a Student Alumni Council member, a research assistant in the philosophy department and a prospective member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. Michael's life goals include writing a memoir, becoming a loving father, and using a Chapstick all the way to the bottom without losing it. 

David Koweek

David Koweek, PhD ’16, is a doctoral candidate in the department of environmental earth system science. As a coastal oceanographer, David travels the world in search of remaining healthy, functioning coastal marine environments. He uses chemical techniques to learn about how these critical ecosystems will respond to a changing planet. David's research has taken him to small atolls in the central Pacific, Antarctica, Bermuda and along the California coast. He loves field science and the sense of adventure it entails. When not traveling, he spends his free time exploring the California coast with a surfboard or scuba gear.

Simar Mangat

Simar Mangat, ’17, plans to major in computer science with a human-computer interaction emphasis. His favorite Stanford experience to date has been the Band Run, where he was swept into a “frenzy of awesomeness” dancing and playing with the Band. With freshmen year under his belt, Simar has already gotten highly involved in Bhangra Punjabi dance, BASES, Student Alumni Council, and Frosh Council. As frosh council president he’s had the opportunity to work closely with other class leaders and plan events for the Class of ’17. He's now excited to be working as sophomore class president. Simar writes a kindness blog and cruises around campus on Fridays giving out free hugs.

Derek Ouyang

Derek Ouyang graduated from Stanford University in 2013 with dual bachelor’s degrees in civil engineering and architectural design, and will return in the fall for a master’s in structural engineering. He was project manager of Stanford’s first-ever entry to the U.S. DOE’s 2013 Solar Decathlon and has been featured as an up-and-coming architect in the Los Angeles Times, in Home Energy magazine’s “30 under 30” and at TEDxStanford. He is now keeping himself busy as co-founder of Cloud Architecture, a young architectural practice working on projects all around the world.

Stacie Vilendrer

Stacie Vilendrer, ’08, MD ’15, MBA ’15, is pursuing an MBA and an MD after having received an undergraduate degree in human biology. Her experiences overseas and at home have highlighted the importance of preventing and managing chronic diseases; her goal now is to bring primary care and preventive medicine to underserved patients. Stacie seeks to help startup companies harness the power of digital and mobile technology for patients. Outside Stanford, she runs a free clinic for local communities and has trained medical workers in Tanzania and India. 

Kerry Wang

Kerry Wang, ’17, a computer science and human biology major, is passionate about human performance technology. She looks forward to applying her interest as a summer intern at Augmedix, a healthcare technology startup revolutionizing patient care using Google Glass. Given all of her experiences at Stanford, she was surprised to find that her most influential teachers have been the five-year olds she tutored through the Haas Center. She thoroughly enjoys her on-campus job at Stanford Student Enterprises, where she is the advertising operations manager. She is also a member of the class community committee on the Student Alumni Council. 

Stay Connected

The event may be over but your connections have only just begun. Explore the many ways you can keep learning from, and connecting with, your Stanford community.

About Stanford+Connects

Stanford+Connects is your chance to re-experience Stanford (minus the midterms), multiply your network, and stretch your brain in infinite ways. Ready?